The Judeo-Christian Concept Of An Agreement Between Man And God Influenced

The term was widely used in the United States during the Cold War to propose a unique American identity against communism. The theologian and author Arthur A. Cohen, in The Myth of the Judeo-Christian Tradition, questioned the theological validity of the Judeo-Christian concept and felt that it was essentially an invention of American politics. Two remarkable books deal with the relationship between contemporary Judaism and Christianity, Abba Hillel Silver Where Judaism Differs and Leo Baecks Judaism and Christianity, both motivated by an impulse to clarify the distinctiveness of Judaism “in a world where the Judeo-Christian term had concealed critical differences between the two beliefs.” [15] In response to the erasure of theological distinctions, Rabbi Eliezer Berkovits wrote: “Judaism is Judaism because it rejects Christianity, and Christianity is Christianity because it rejects Judaism.” [16] Theologian and author Arthur A. Cohen, in The Myth of the Judeo-Christian Tradition, questioned the theological validity of the Judeo-Christian concept and felt that it was essentially an invention of American politics, while Jacob Neusner, in Jews and Christians: The Myth of a Common Tradition, wrote: “The two beliefs represent different people who speak different things.” [17] After the Holocaust “there was a revolution in Christian theology in America. […] The biggest change in Christian attitude towards the Jewish people since Constantine converted the Roman Empire. [10] The rise of Christian Zionism, the religious Christian interest and the support of the State of Israel, as well as the rise of philosemitism have increased interest in Judaism among American evangelicals, and this interest is particularly focused on the areas of communion between the doctrines of Judaism and their own beliefs. In the late 1940s, evangelical supporters of the new Judeo-Christian approach called on Washington to provide diplomatic support to the new state of Israel. On the other hand, in the late 1960s, Protestant denominations and the National Council of Churches showed more support for Palestinians than Israelis. [11] Interest and positive attitude towards America`s Judeo-Christian tradition have become the mainstream among evangelicals. [12] As soon as one realizes that Christianity has historically produced anti-Semitism, this so-called tradition appears as a dangerous Christian dogma (at least from the Jewish point of view).

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